Archivio news

Eventi

Seminario C.I.R.M.A.N.ME.C

Auletta 1 DPSS, via Venezia 8, Padova

15.06.2016

La Riserva cognitiva e la sua misura: evidenze e applicabilità nella valutazione e riabilitazione

leggi

Eventi

Giornata di formazione

Sala conferenze - via Venezia 15 / Aula informatica 4N - Psico2, via Venezia 12

10.06.2016

Didattica partecipativa per la psicologia

leggi

Eventi

Open Day Cognitive neuroscience and clinical neuropsychology a.a. 2016/2017

13.04.2016

leggi

Eventi

Corso di formazione "Biofeedback: Corso Base e HRV Biofeedback"

via Belzoni,84 - Padova

Dal 18.03.2016 al 20.03.2016

18-19-20/03/2016 - aggiornamento delle competenze in biofeedback

leggi

Eventi

Seminar Dr. Lorenzo Fontolan "Encoding speech through cortical oscillations"

Abstract The fact that feed-forward and top-down propagation of sensory information use distinct frequency bands is an appealing assumption for which evidence remains scarce. From human depth recordings in two auditory cortical regions, while subjects listen to sentences, we show that information travels in each direction using separate frequency channels. Bottom-up and top-down propagation dominates in gamma and beta bands, respectively. The predominance of low frequencies for top-down information transfer is confirmed by cross-regional frequency coupling, which indicates that the power of gamma activity in A1 is modulated by the phase of beta activity sampled from association auditory cortex (AAC). Finally, we show that information transfer does not proceed continuously but by time windows where bottom-up or top-down processing alternatively dominates. Furthermore, in order to better understand the role of brain rhythms in speech perception we built a neural model that addresses whether coupled intrinsic theta and gamma oscillations, as observed in human auditory cortex, could underpin the multiscale sensory analysis of speech. Speech presents, as a matter of fact, a quasi-rhythmic structure at different timescales that the brain needs to decompose and integrate. Cortical oscillations have been proposed as instruments of sensory de-multiplexing, i.e., the parallel processing of different frequency streams in sensory signals. We show that theta-spiking oscillations can flexibly track the syllabic rhythm in continuous speech, and temporally organize the phoneme-level response of gamma neurons into a code that allows for syllable identification in continuous speech. These results suggest a potential mechanistic role for cortical oscillations in speech de-multiplexing, parsing, and encoding.

leggi